"Without support and funding from Harvest, we would be unable to develop, promote and sustain initiatives to address health issues and work toward a healthier future for Martinsville and Henry County. "
- Barbara Jackman, Executive Director - MHC Coalition for Health and Wellness
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Harvest grant to aid launch of Latino fair

February 5, 2013

From Bulletin staff reporters:

The Harvest Foundation has approved a $10,000 Pick Up the Pace! grant to Centro Familial Cristiano Amigos Iglesia Casa De Alabanza to create a health fair for Latino residents of Martinsville and Henry County, according to a release from Harvest.

The grant will support location costs, promotional materials, on-site activities and educational materials, stipends for local high school students as translators and transportation, the release stated.

“The Latino health fair is the brainchild of the Latino Health Access Taskforce, an offshoot of the Community Health Strategic Planning project facilitated by the Foundation several years ago,” Nancy Cox, Harvest Foundation Director of Programs said in the release. “Jaime Herrera, Pastor of Casa De Alabanza, is on this task force, which is co-chaired by Sharon Ortiz-Garcia (of the West Piedmont Health District) and Jim Tobin (of Piedmont Community Services).

“This group is the first community-wide effort of agency representatives and Latino community leaders coming together to focus on the healthcare needs of the Latino population,” Cox added in the release. “The mission of the Latino Health Access Taskforce,” said Ortiz-Garcia, “is to identify the barriers to healthcare and community supports, and develop plans to improve healthcare access.”

The grant was the fourth of 10 PUP grants Harvest plans to issue. Each will be up to $10,000 and go toward projects that will be completed within 90 days, Harvest Program Officer Angela Logan said.

“The health fair will be culturally sensitive, family friendly and festive,” Herrera said in the release. “It is our hope that each person will walk away connected to community resources, and will feel more engaged in the overall community.”

PUP projects must relate to one or more of Harvest’s focus areas: health, education and community vitality. Recipients must be recognized nonprofits, religious institutions, government entities or “fiscal agents” acting for others, so long as the purpose is charitable, Harvest said.

“We are very excited to be a partner in this first ever event for the fastest growing segment of our population,” said Cox. “By focusing on the barriers the Latino population encounters in order to access healthcare, the Latino health fair should be a huge success.”

 




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